Projects

LED Cube Exhibit

matled_led_cube_paul_kassebaum

A 3 foot tall LED cube installed in the front lobby of the headquarters of MathWorks. Programmed with MATLAB, the flagship product of MathWorks. Employees may upload custom animations.

Harmonic Flow

hamiltonian_flow_paul_kassebaum

This piece is a visualization of the path a series of pendulums take over time through phase space: an abstract, two dimensional space of position versus momentum (mass times velocity). The horizontal axis is associated with the position of each pendulum, while the vertical axis is associated with the momentum of each pendulum. Follow each colored circle clockwise from its initial alignment along the right horizontal axis and you will be tracing the stroboscopic path of pendulums through phase space. Notice how the circles get distorted along the path. A theorem of physics known as Liouville’s theorem states that the area of any segment in phase space remains the same as its gets distorted through its path. This is analogous to a drop of ink dispersing in water. This piece was inspired by Liouville’s theorem.

Tensegral Hypar

hyperbolic_paraboloid_paul_kassebaum

A hyperbolic paraboloid made with twine and a bicycle tire inner tube. All of the strings are of the same length and are too short to allow the inner tube to be inflated and remain flat in a plane. This construction is called a ruled surface. The shadow of the strings cast below the structure form a grid of perpendicular lines. The inner tube has variable curvature and torsion.

Eye of Mobius

mobius_eye_paul_kassebaum

A human eye distorted by the complex function of a complex variable known as the Mobius transformation. The Mobius transformation maps circles in one plane to circles in another plane. The approximate circular symmetry of the eye makes it a fascinating argument.

Dipolar Field

vector_plot_electric_dipole_paul_kassebaum

A visualization of the electric field produced by a dipole using a software package I wrote in MATLAB to plot general vector fields. The field is sampled at the center of each ellipsoid. Each ellipsoid points (from dark end to bright end) in the direction of the field. The brightness of the tip of each ellipsoid represents the field’s strength at that point. This is an allusion to sprinkling iron filings around a bar magnet.

Intro Robotics Course

intro_robotics_course_paul_kassebaum

Developed and taught a course that introduces robotics using Arduino microcontrollers and Simulink at the Artisan’s Ayslum. Students learn how to program their robots to maintain speed up and down ramps, follow lines on the floor, and compete one-on-one in a sumo fight. Click here to read the advertisement for the course.

Autonomous Fighting Robot Design Challenge 2014

autonomous_fighting_robots_2014_paul_kassebaumautonomous_fighting_robots_2_2014_paul_kassebaum

Head organizer of a robotics competition that gave eight teams two weeks to build robots with access to a makerspace and training on manufacturing tools, physical modeling software, and programming software. I pulled together teams from the Artisan’s Asylum, MathWorks, Autodesk, Sparkfun, the Museum of Science, the Cambridge Science Festival, Creosphere (sound and lights), and the Middle East Restaurant and Nightclub (the venue for the public fight). Click here to read an article by WBUR on the competition.

Autonomous Fighting Robot Design Challenge 2013

robotDesignChallenge_2013_paul_kassebaum

Head organizer of a robotics competition that gave eight teams one week to build robots with access to a makerspace and training on manufacturing tools and programming software. I pulled together teams from the Artisan’s Asylum, MathWorks, the Cambridge Science Festival, CEMI (sound and lights), and Arts at the Armory (the venue for the public fight). Click here to watch a short video documenting the whole process.

Anamorphic 3D Prints

anamorphicLShapedMembrane_paul_kassebaum

You’ve seen funny mirrors at carnivals, the curvy ones that make your head look tiny and your legs impossibly long. Now imagine a person who looks strange in real life, say with a giant head and extremely short legs. Put this unusual character in front of the same curvy mirror and now you see someone who looks normal. That’s the idea behind an anamorphic representation. In a blog post hosted by MathWorks, I explain how to compute the inverse funhouse mirror effect for any 3D print. Click here to read the whole story.

The History of Early Modern Physics: A Digital Exhibit

Co-authored an interactive website of four parts that teaches the historical development of quantum mechanics and relativity in the context of the World Wars. Presented at the Humanities+Digital Visual Interpretations Conference organized by the MIT Center for Comparative Media Studies.